REVIEW: A Divided Duty: Rossini’s Otello at O22 (for Parterre Box)

As a critic, my time is spent about equally between theater and music. I have many smart friends in both areas, and I’m often pulled into conversations within the former group about what they see as the dramatic limitations of some operas. A negative attitude specifically toward the bel canto school is a particular idée fixe among my theatre people.

There are predictable complaints about the damsel-in-distress stories. But even more, what I hear is that it’s the musical style and structure—something about the frequent use of cavatinas (to demonstrate legato) and cabalettas (to showcase virtuosity)—that pulls my theater friends out of the moment.

As a critic, my time is spent about equally between theater and music. I have many smart friends in both areas, and I’m often pulled into conversations within the former group about what they see as the dramatic limitations of some operas. A negative attitude specifically toward the bel canto school is a particular idée fixe among my theatre people.

I thought about this watching and listening to Rossini’s Otello, the centerpiece of Opera Philadelphia’s Festival O22. It’s a show that I think offers a fascinating blend of pros-and-cons that could provide supporting evidence to both camps…

Click here to read the full post at Parterre Box.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow me on Twitter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 108 other followers

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 108 other followers
%d bloggers like this: